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September 21, 2017

Less than a month after Krita 3.2.1, we’re getting ready to release Krita 3.3.0. We’re bumping the version because there are some important changes for Windows users in this version!

Alvin Wong has implemented support for the Windows 8 event API, which means that Krita now supports the n-trig pen in the Surface line of laptops (and similar laptops from Dell, HP and Acer) natively. This is still very new, so you have to enable this in the tablet settings:

And he also refactored Krita’s hardware-accelerated display functionality to optionally use Angle on Windows instead of native OpenGL. That means that many problems with Intel display chips and broken driver versions are worked around because Krita now indirectly uses Direct3D.

There are more changes in this release, of course:

  • Some visual glitches when using hi-dpi screens are fixed (remember: on Windows and Linux, you need to enable this in the settings dialog).
  • If you create a new image from clipboard, the image will have a title
  • Favorite blending modes and favorite brush presets are now loaded correctly on startup
  • GMIC
    • the plugin has been updated to the latest version for Windows and Linux.
    • the configuration for setting the path to the plugin has been removed. Krita looks for the plugin in the folder where the krita executable is, and optionally inside a folder with a name that starts with ‘gmic’ next to the krita executable.
    • there are several fixes for handling layers and communication between Krita and the plugin
  • Some websites save jpeg images with a .png extension: that used to confuse Krita, but Krita now first looks inside the file to see what kind of file it really is.
  • PNG:
    • 16 and 32 bit floating point images are now converted to 16 bit integer when saving the images as PNG.
    • It’s now possible to save the alpha channel to PNG images even if there are no (semi-) transparent pixels in the image
  • When hardware accelerated display is disabled, the color picker mode of the brush tool showed a broken cursor; this has been fixed.
  • The Reference Images docker now only starts loading images when it is visible, instead on Krita startup. Note: the reference images docker uses Qt’s imageio plugins to load images. If you are running on Linux, remove all Deepin desktop components. Deepin comes with severely broken qimageio plugins that will crash any Qt application that tries to display images.
  • File layers now correctly reload on change again
  • Add several new commandline options:
    • –nosplash to start Krita without showing the splash screen
    • –canvasonly to start Krita in canvas-only mode
    • –fullscreen to start Krita full-screen
    • –workspace Workspace to start Krita with the given workspace
  • Selections
    • The Select All action now first clears the selection before selecting the entire image
    • It is now possible to extend selections outside the canvas boundary
  • Performance improvements: in several places superfluous reads from the settings were eliminated, which makes generating a layer thumbnail faster and improves painting if display acceleration is turned off.
  • The smart number input boxes now use the current locale to follow desktop settings for numbers
  • The system information dialog for bug reports is improved
  • macOS/OSX specific changes:
    • Bernhard Liebl has improved the tablet/stylus accuracy. The problem with circles having straight line segments is much improved, though it’s not perfect yet.
    • On macOS/OSX systems with and AMD gpu, support for hardware accelerated display is disabled because saving to PNG and JPG hangs Krita otherwise.

Download

Windows

Note for Windows users: if you encounter crashes, please follow these instructions to use the debug symbols so we can figure out where Krita crashes. There are no 32 bits packages at this point, but there will be for the final release.

Linux

(If, for some reason, Firefox thinks it needs to load this as text: to download, right-click on the link.)

When it is updated, you can also use the Krita Lime PPA to install Krita 3.3.0-rc.1 on Ubuntu and derivatives.

OSX

Note: the gmic-qt and pdf plugins are not available on OSX.

Source code

md5sums

For all downloads:

Key

The Linux appimage and the source tarball are signed. You can retrieve the public key over https here:
0x58b9596c722ea3bd.asc
. The signatures are here.

Support Krita

Krita is a free and open source project. Please consider supporting the project with donations or by buying training videos or the artbook! With your support, we can keep the core team working on Krita full-time.

KDE España busca sede para Akademy-es 2018,  lo que será su decimotercera edición de Akademy-es, un encuentro entre desarrolladores, usuarios, diseñadores, traductores, simpatizantes o cualquier otro grupo de personas que le interese este proyecto de Software Libre que tantas alegrías nos da y nos seguirá dando.

¿Qué es una Akademy-es?

Una Akademy-es es un excelente lugar donde recargar las pilas si estás dentro de KDE a la vez que una excelente forma de empezar a involucrarte. Además os puedo asegurar que son unas jornadas donde se aprenden muchas cosas, siempre te llevas a casa nuevas experiencias, diferentes puntos de vista y …. una camiseta molona.

Foto de grupo de Akademy-es 2016 de Madrid

KDE España busca sede para Akademy-es 2018

El comunicado es breve y escueto, como siempre:
Como cada año, KDE España organiza Akademy-es, el evento relacionado con KDE más importante del año en España, en el que usuarios y desarrolladores se dan cita para compartir experiencias y conocer las principales novedades de KDE a través de diversas actividades, entre las que destacan conferencias y talleres.

Para la celebración de Akademy-es, KDE España solicita la colaboración de un grupo/asociación en calidad de co-organizador, que facilite algunas de las tareas necesarias para hacer de la edición 2018 un éxito de participación y organización.

Las condiciones básicas y los datos necesarios para presentar la candidatura son los siguientes:

  • Datos de contacto
  • Localización. Debe tener capacidad para unas 75 personas con internet y posibilidad de libre acceso.
  • Datos del grupo organizador e instituciones/entidades colaboradoras.
  • Descripción del equipo organizador.
  • Propuestas de hospedaje asequible para todo aquel interesado en acudir desde otras ciudades.
  • Datos relacionados con el acceso a la localización desde otras ciudades (por avión, tren, etc.) así como al lugar de celebración del evento.
  • Descripción de posibles fuentes de financiación. Aunque es preferible poder asegurarla a priori, no se descartarán las propuestas que no cumplan esta condición.
  • Posibles fechas de celebración de Akademy-es. La fecha habitual es durante los meses de abril o mayo, aunque no se descartarán otras propuestas. El evento debe celebrarse preferentemente de viernes tarde a domingo a mediodía.
KDE España busca sede para Akademy-es 2018

Foto de grupo de Akademy-es 2017 de Almería

La fecha límite de presentación de propuestas para la celebración de Akademy-es es el 18 de diciembre de 2017.

Ante cualquier duda, ponerse en contacto con KDE España (akademy-es-org@kde-espana.es)

 

¡Nos vemos en la próxima Akademy-es!

September 20, 2017

This week has been focused on finishing the development of persistent notifications at the top of the music views. They are intended to provide information about what happen with actions the user can take to improve things.

The following items have been pushed:

  • Clean up of dependencies. Now all frameworks come with a description. Some have been downgraded to optional or recommended. Some have been upgraded to recommended ;
  • A new version of persistent notifications.

The new persistent notifications

The player can be in four states:

  • No notifications are active
    Screenshot_20170920_224107No notifications

     

  • One notification is activeScreenshot_20170920_224429One notification

     

  • More than one notifications are active. Only one is shown such that vertical space is preserved

    Screenshot_20170920_224700.pngMultiple notifications with the first visible
  • The notifications area is expanded and several notifications are visible
    Screenshot_20170920_224830.pngShow multiple notifications

     

If the user choose to act, the buttons are temporarily disabled to provide instant feedback and the notification disappear when the root cause is fixed (like in the example, if music tracks are discovered or Baloo configuration is modified or Baloo music indexer is disabled in Elisa.).

I have tried to provide smooth transitions between each of those states. Some may still be missing. Please do not hesitate to provide feedback on this feature.

I plan to add more notifications of this kind when the software wants to provide feedback to the user and asks him to choose what he prefers.

Next week, I should continue to improve integration with Baloo. I would also like to improve (in fact allow) the keyboard interaction.


Please read the following guest post from Łukasz who joined me last week in Randa to work on KMyMoney.   Good things have happened in Randa and are going to happen to KMyMoney afterwards. During that time I’ve started to work on the appearance of the application in regard to colors. I think it’s a …


On Monday I presented at the Ceph Meetup in Berlin about a new project sponsored by Deutsche Telekom to store emails on Ceph. The project consists of librmb and rbox. While librmb (librados mailbox) is a generic abstraction layer to store emails in RADOS, rbox is a plugin for Dovecot to make use of the new library.


The code is released under LGPLv2.1 and now available at github. The project is still under heavy development and not in a released state. Therefore the code and APIs can still change, but we really would like to invite every interested party to check it out, test the code and report findings and bugs back to the project. Be part of the project and contribute code! We plan to move the librmb code later to the Ceph project and the rbox plugin to Dovecot. For more information on the project check out the README or take a look at my presentation from the Meetup.

I would like to thank our partners in this project: Tallence, Wido den Hollander (42on.com), and SUSE.

Los podcast GNU/Linux siguen estando de moda. Y es que esta semana se ha sabido que Salmorejo Geek, el gran podcast sobre tecnología de Yoyo Fernández, ha sido nominado como finalista de la VIII edición de los Premios de la Asociación Podcast. No es que Salmorejo Geek solo sea sobre GNU/LInux pero nuestro mundillo siempre está presente en muchos de sus minutos.

 

Salmorejo Geek finalista VIII edición de los Premios de la Asociación Podcast

La Comunidad linuxera está de enhorabuena. En estos momentos, cualquiera que quiera puede tener en su reproductor de podcast favorito horas y horas de programas enlatados de gente hablando sobre GNU, Linux, escritorios, aplicaciones, eventos y cientos de proyectos relacionados con el Software y el Conocimiento Libre.

Y no solo eso, sino que este medio de comunicación tan íntimo y personal hace que, bajo mi punto de vista, el Software Libre vaya calando más y más entre una sociedad del conocimiento que todavía desconoce muchas cosas.

De esta forma, me atrevo a decir que este año, que tampoco ha sido el del escritorio GNU/Linux, si que lo está siendo de los podcast Linux y la difusión linuxera está en auge.

Así, al gran éxito del Maratón Linuxero, a la proliferación de grandes podcast sobre este movimiento como Podcast Linux o Compilando Podcast (y otros más que me dejo pero que todavía no conozco a fondo) y a a la gran acogida de los podcast de KDE España, debemos sumar el reconocimiento que ya ha recibido el gran podcaster Yoyo al ser seleccionado su Salmorejo Geek como finalista de los VIII Premios de la Asociación Podcast en la categoría de Tecnología.

Estos Premios de la Asociación Podcat, en palabras de sus creadores “tienen como objetivo principal dar visibilidad y difusión al podcasting y reconocer el trabajo de quienes lo hacen posible, así como contribuir a enriquecer el podcasting a partir de un debate sobre la generación y producción de contenidos en formato podcast.”

De esta forma, Salmorejo Geek se está codeando con otros podcast donde se habla de muy diversos temas y planta la bandera del pingüino y del ñu dejando claro que somos una Comunidad a tener en cuenta por múltiples motivos. Que esté Salmorejo Geek entre los otros podcast y que nos dé visibilidad es muy importante y es de recibo dedicarle toda nuestra atención.

Salmorejo Geek

Desde KDE Blog no quiero ser menos y decir…

¡Mucha suerte y a por el premio, Salmorejo Geek! ¡Estamos contigo!

 

 

Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed. Apart from that, I managed to fix a few more bugs, and work on adding a splash screen to the Android app:

  • Made the bookmarks dialog responsive to touch everywhere. When we tapped on the Search field in the app, if nothing was written in that field then the bookmarks dialog showed up there. If the number of bookmarks was <= 6, then the far-lower part of the dialog did nothing on being tapped. Made that portion choose the last item from the bookmarks list in that case.
  • There was an issue where pressing the back-button always led to closing the app instead of handling that event depending on the various scenarios. On looking, it was found that the root-cause for the issue was lying in the code of Kirigami itself. Reported the same to Marco Martin, and fixed the issue in the Marble app via a workaround by using Kirigami.AbstractApplicationWindow instead of Kirigami.ApplicationWindow in the Qml. Also reported the issue that svg icons were not showing up in the app on Plasma Mobile because of svg icons not being enabled there.

  • Worked on adding a splash screen to the Marble Maps app. The highest resolution of the Marble logo in png that we had at the moment was 192 x 192, which looked a bit blurry, as if it had been scaled up, so I just displayed it as 100×100 for the splash screen to make it look sharp. Later, Torsten created a 256×256 version of the png from an svg, which got rid of the blur in the previous png. So I added that in the splash screen later, and the icon there looks much bigger, sharper, and non-blurry now.
    wordpress

Apart from work, there was snow this year, did some interesting acro-yoga with Frederik, did a 3-hour hike to walk across the longest pedestrian suspension bridge in the world, went on a tour to Zermatt to catch a glimpse of the Matterhorn, and ended it all with having a delicious barbecue with Emmanuel and Tomaz somewhere up in the mountains on the final evening. Thanks to Mario for organizing the meetings and the cheese and chocolates, without which no work could have been done.

banner-fundraising2017


Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.

The banner is 1500×385 SVG.

Please submit designs to the Kubuntu-devel mail list.

September 19, 2017

I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains.
It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).

I have to admit we didn’t spend all our time on accessibilty, since we’ve recently done a big push in that direction already with keyboard navigation and translation preparations. Anyhow, here’s an overview on what we’ve worked on:

Query performance

While it might now be a showstopper, there is an annoyance in Kube that if you initially sync a lot of mail (my INBOX alone contains 40k) this not only uses a lot of CPU in the synchronizer process (which is expected), but also in the Kube client process, which seems odd at first.

The reason for this are the live queries, which update themselves whenever the resource signals that it has a new revision available (A new revision could be a new mail or a modification for instance). Usually, when we process an update we do so incrementally. If you just received a new mail or two, or something has been marked as read etc., that is also the sensible thing to do. It’s a comparatively tiny amount of work, and we really want incremental changes in the result anyways, otherwise we’d mess up the client’s UI state (selection, scroll position, …).

However, when we fetch 40k mails that also means we get 40k updates that we have to process and it’s surprisingly hard to avoid that:

  • We don’t know in advance that there will be 40k updates, so we have to process the updates initially.
  • We can’t really skip any updates, because any update might affect what we have in the view. We just don’t know until we’ve already processed it.
  • We can’t just fall back to redoing the full query because we need incremental changes, otherwise you’d see a blinking UI until the sync is done.
  • We don’t want to just stop updating until the sync is done, because in most cases you already have useful data to work with, so this is really a background task, and we don’t want to block all updates.

If you end up processing the larger part of the data-set as incremental update it becomes naturally really expensive, because you can’t leverage the indexes which made queries efficient in the first place. So this is not something that can just be optimized away.

This means some middleground has to be struck which allows for updates, but doesn’t render the application maxed out because it’s updating so fast.

A possible approach to fix this would be the following:

  • Set some threshold when it becomes cheaper to redo the query instead of processing the updates.
  • If the threshold is reached, redo the query from scratch.
  • Diff the current results with the redone results so we can still update the UI incrementally.
  • Apply some event compression to the revision updates, so we land in the optimized path quicker.

Given that this really isn’t a huge problem right now, since the application does remain responsive (querying is done in a separate thread), and this will only ever happen if you sync a large folder for the first time, I won’t spend a lot of time on that for now. The most important part was figuring out why this problem appeared in the first place, and understanding it’s reasons and implications. This will allow us to attack it properly once we get to it.

HTML composer

Kube’s composer is currently a simple text field where you can type plain text. This is obviously not the end goal.
To explore our options in providing a more advanced composer, we tried prototyping a simple HTML editor.
Unfortunately our experiments showed that QML isn’t really up to that yet. The official example falls flat on it’s face when trying it (it simply fails except for a few specific cases), and the “API” to do any sort of formatting is more a hack than anything else.

Granted, the API docs of the TextArea also state that you can’t modify the internal document, or in other words, no HTML composer for us.

The options we have left are:

  • Some custom text editing component (sounds like a lot of work, probably is).
  • Try to hack around TextAreas deficiencies until we find some magic combination that works.
  • Use a WebView and implement everything in javascript (now that’s just sad).

For now the item is postponed.

GPG Support

We’ve scoped out what we want to reach for initial GPG support in Kube. While we already have read-only GPG support (we can decrypt mails and verify signatures), there is some more work to be done until we can also sign and encrypt messages we’re sending. The focus will be on keeping things simple to get the job done, and not build the most advanced GPG interface ever.

Things that will happen are:

  • Key selection for the account that will then be used for encryption.
  • Key setup for new accounts that don’t have a key yet (either by importing an existing key or creating a new one)
  • Encryption option in the composer that depends on the availability of keys for all recipients.
  • Key selection for users in the addressbook.

All of it can be found on Phabricator

Cross platform builds

Since we had some cross platform building experts on site, I explored some of our options:

  • Cross compiling for Windows with MXE.
  • Building on Windows and OSX using craft.
  • Building with some custom scripts on Windows.
  • Building with macports on OSX.
  • Building with brew on OSX.

Although I had mixed feelings about craft back from the days when I used emerge (the craft predecessor) to build Kontact on Windows,
it at least looks like the most sensible option still.

Crosscompiling using MXE seems ok-ish for Windows; I had some success for parts of the stack and the rest will just be the grunt work of making tarballs and writing build definition files. At least that way you don’t have to work on a Windows system. However I heard that the compiled end-result will just not be as good as using native compilers, so perhaps it’s not worth it to trade some building convenience for a sub-par end result.
Also, writing the definition files is pretty exactly the same as for craft, and MXE would be for Windows only.

So, looks like I’ll be doing another round with craft sometime soonish.

Plasma phone

IMG_20170914_141340

It kinda works.

Bushan Sha quickly wipped up a package for the Plasma Phone and installed it, which allowed us to see Kube running for the first time on a mobile device, which felt surprisingly cool ��

There clearly are some rough edges, such as the UI being completely unsuitable for that form factor (who would have thought…), and a bug in one of the QML components which breaks folder selection using a touch screen. Still, it was nice to see =)

Input validation

To improve the UX with forms in Kube, or more specifically the configuration dialog, we wanted to provide some feedback to the user on what fields need to be filled out. Michael implemented a neat little visualization that that marks invalid input fields and gently fades away once the input becomes valid.

Screenshot_20170919_232321

Screenshot_20170919_232514

So far we only validate that fields are not empty, but that can be changed by assigning new validators that e.g. check that an email address field indeed contains a valid email address.

Recap

It was once again a very productive week, with lot’s of good food and a couple of fun hikes in between to clear out the head.
Besides the usual work going on it’s invaluable to have an exchange with other people that just might have solved the problem already that you’re going to spend the next few weeks on. So in many ways this is not only about a concentrated work effort, but also about professional training and exchange, and that is only possible in when you’re sitting together with those people.

I’d like to thank the whole team that organized the sprint, took care of us with great food and lot’s of chocolate and generally just made our stay in Randa great once more.

If you made it all the way down here and skipped the fundraiser on top, please consider donating something, it’s the only way we can keep doing meetings like this and they are invaluable for us as a community.


En muchas ocasiones el ritmo diario de publicaciones en el blog y la cantidad de temas existentes no da para dedicarle el tiempo que se merecen alguno proyectos que, por desgracia, si se lo merecen. Es el caso de Noc y Lux, dos grandes temas para Plasma 5, que le dan un toque extraordinariamente elegante a tu escritorio.

Noc y Lux, dos grandes temas para Plasma 5

De la mano de David Linares (aka @mcder3) y Fabián Alexis (aka @_fabianalexis) hoy quiero presentaros Noc y Lux, un par de temas que potencian la elegancia inherente al escritorio Plasma de la Comunidad KDE y que le vienen como anillo a un dedo con el tema de iconos Antü (de la cual se está haciendo una revisión…. artículo a la vista).

Estos temas están inspirados en el famoso juego de rol japonés Final Fantasy XV. Concretamente, Noc está basado en los colores oscuros del personaje Noctis, mientras que Lux nace del  poder que éste genera.

Noc y Lux

Noc con iconos Antü. Captura de Carlos M.‏ @Hefistion_

Como se puede apreciar en las capturas inferiores, estos temas destacan por su cuidado en los detalles y su ambientación oscura, lo cual los hacen muy elegantes. Así podemos ver que el tema Noc tiene detalles azulados, mientras que Lux los tiene de color rojo. También destacan sus preciosos iconos de la bandeja del sistema y su curioso reloj analógico.

Aunque se puede probar a instalar desde el gestor de Temas para Plasma de las Preferencias del Sistema, os recomiendo que lo hagáis extrayendo los temas en la carpeta /home/user/.local/share/plasma/desktoptheme/, y de esta forma poder disfrutarlos todos a la vez.

Noc y Lux

Lux en mi KDE Neon

Además, al parecer este par de grandes desarrolladores latinoamericanos pretenden seguir ofreciendo nuevos temas y ya están preparando variaciones sobre este par de sobrios temas. De esta forma, si visitáis su página de Github podréis observar que estos temas están agrupados en el denominado The-Lucis-Project.

Y como siempre digo, si os gusta el pack de iconos podéis “pagarlo” de muchas formas en la página de KDE Store, que estoy seguro que el desarrollador lo agradecerá: puntúale positivamente, hazle un comentario en la página o realiza una donación. Ayudar al desarrollo del Software Libre también se hace simplemente dando las gracias, ayuda mucho más de lo que os podéis imaginar, recordad la campaña I love Free Software Day 2017 de la Free Software Foundation donde se nos recordaba esta forma tan secilla de colaborar con el gran proyecto del Software Libre y que en el blog dedicamos un artículo.

Más información: KDE Store

Last week I had a chance to attend the Randa meetings 2017, my plan was to work on the Plasma Mobile during the sprint, improve the state of current images. Few things changed over the course of the week:

New shiny wallpaper and packages

Starting from 8 Sept, we started using the packages from KDE Neon buildsystem instead of building them on the Plasma Mobile CI, this provides few benefits,

  • No need to separately build the common things like Qt5, KDE Frameworks, Plasma
  • Always up-to-date packages, no need to manually re-trigger builds for common things

We also upgraded to newer version of Qt, Qt 5.9 from the older version of Qt 5.7.1, this aligns our stack with whatever KDE Neon dev unstable edition is using.

Shiny Plasma

Rootfs for non-nexus Qualcomm devices

Non-nexus Qualcomm devices use a modified version of the hwcomposer.h which is not ABI compatible with the generic version of the android API headers, so for them the libhybris and kwin need to be separately built. Previously our CI infrastructure didn’t support this workflow, however now we are able to create the rootfs for such devices. Below is an image of Plasma Mobile running on Xiomi Mi device.

Plasma Mobile on CAF device

Marble maps

At Randa, we had a chance to test the newer version of the Marble maps, which has much more improved performance when zooming out-in. We were able to happily search locate Randa in the Marble maps.

Marble maps on Plasma Mobile

QML based mobile friendly “konsole”

Previously we were using Konsole from the KDE Applications as a terminal emulator, however Konsole user interface was not mobile-friendly, and it was not possible to e.g, tab complete the command, go through history, etc. At Randa Emmanuel Lepage Vallee pointed us to qmltermwidget, which powers the terminal application in Ubuntu Touch and Cool-retro-term application. Marco Martin was able to write a simple QML application around qmltermwidget which can replace Konsole in Plasma Mobile.

QML based Terminal application

Kirigami based koko

During GSoC 2017 lot of work has been put to port the normal QtQuick based image viewer application Koko to kirigami2, you can follow the work of Student developer Atul Sharma on his blog. At the Randa Sprint, we were able to test this work on Plasma Mobile and it shows great improvements compared to the older version.

Koko, image gallery application

Improved window switching experience

Due to a bug in the Plasma Mobile shell, shell windows such as task switcher and shell itself were also appearing in the task switcher, as a result of that user was able to close the shell window which ultimately ends up crashing the plasmashell. We were able to fix this bug in the plasma-workspace and plasma-phone-components so that Plasma Mobile shell windows would not appear in the task switcher.

Task switching

Kube(!!!)

Yes, that is Kube in the first picture, we were able to run the Kube on the Plasma Mobile, it works in theory on Plasma Mobile, however the user interface is not mobile-friendly and needs various fixes to be usable on mobile. We will work with the Kube team to fix the issues and then test them on Plasma Mobile in the future.

Conclusion

That is all for now, I would like to thank the all the donors who donated for the Randa Meetings 2017, and made it possible for me to travel to Randa, Switzerland.

If you liked the work done on Plasma Mobile during the Randa Sprint, please support us on Randa 2017 fundraiser to make events like Randa possible in the future.

September 18, 2017

Adventurous users and developers running the Artful development release can now also test the beta version of Plasma 5.11. This is experimental and can possibly kill kittens!

Bug reports on this beta go to https://bugs.kde.org, not to Launchpad.

The PPA comes with a WARNING: Artful will ship with Plasma 5.10.5, so please be prepared to use ppa-purge to revert changes. Plasma 5.11 will ship too late for inclusion in Kubuntu 17.10, but should be available via backports soon after release day, October 19th, 2017.

Read more about the beta release: https://www.kde.org/announcements/plasma-5.10.95.php

If you want to test on Artful: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/beta && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt full-upgrade -y

The purpose of this PPA is testing, and bug reports go to bugs.kde.org.

September 17, 2017

“Kube is a modern communication and collaboration client built with QtQuick on top of a high performance, low resource usage core. It provides online and offline access to all your mail, contacts, calendars, notes, todo’s and more. With a strong focus on usability, the team works with designers and UX experts from the ground up, to build a product that is not only visually appealing but also a joy to use.”

For more info, head over to: kube.kde.org

  • We now synchronize both contacts and drafts when opening the composer. The former are required for autocompletion, the latter to show your drafts.
  • A maillist filter bar to replace the currently defunct search.
  • We now synchronize the currently selected folder every 5min.
  • Bumped Qt requirement to 5.9 so we can finally use the focus stealing prevention of the webengineview.
  • Automatically launch into the account configuration if no accounts are set-up.
  • A single account mode for deployments that support only a single account. This can currently only be activated with a switch in the qml code.
  • Prototyped a simple html editor, unfortunately the QML TextArea API is just not there yet and the end result ended up buggy. Postponed for now.
  • Worked out a plan for gpg based encryption that is now available as phabricator tickets for the next milestone.
  • Improved input form validation and feedback.
  • Did some work towards improving a performance bottleneck in live queries when a lot (thousands) of updates are coming in (such as during the initial sync). Not quite there yet though.
  • Did some cross compilation experiments with MXE for Windows and without MXE for Android. WIP
  • Witnessed Kube on the Plasma Phone. This will require an adapted UI but generally seems to actually work.
  • Fixed some layouting issues where some TextAreas wouldn’t resize with the rest of the UI.

Kube Commits, Sink Commits

Previous updates


We have a new round of Kate installers for Windows. This round comes with some installer-bug fixes (all project plugin dlls) and support for editorconfig files http://editorconfig.org/.

Project plugin analyzing codeIn the above screen-shot you can see the project plugin analyzing Kate code. This works if you have cppcheck installed and added to the path.

Grab the installers now at download.kde.org:  Kate-setup-17.08.1-KF5.38-32bit or Kate-setup-17.08.1-KF5.38-64bit

Hi all,

Today I got an opportunity to celebrate Linux's 26th anniversary (17th September 1991) with the LinuxChix India team (http://india.linuxchix.org/).

I gave a talk on:

  • Unix, GNU, and  Linux's history 
  • And shared my experience using Linux, Ubuntu, and Kubuntu



It was a great interactive session. We shared some thoughts about:

  • SSH's working
  • Linux distributions
  • Flavours of Ubuntu
  • Kubuntu, KDE Plasma 5 and KDE frameworks, 
  • Linux file system 
  • Kernels and its role
  • Various Linux Commands

I would like to thank Shivani Bhardwaj and Priyal Trivedi for organising the meetup and Amit Kumar for introducing me to the team.

Link to the slides of my talk:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B9XiOPGG2l_vcTNNcEVhVjV1RnM/view?usp=sharing

Official Raspbian images based on Debian Stretch by default has the Pixel desktop environment and will login new users to it. But if you have had a Raspbian installation with another DE (such as LXDE), here are the steps to install and login to the Pixel desktop.

  1. apt-get install raspberrypi-ui-mods
  2. sed -i 's/^autologin-user=pi/#autologin-user=pi/' /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf
  3. update-alternatives --set x-session-manager /usr/bin/startlxde-pi
  4. sed -i 's/^Session=.*/Session=lightdm-xsession/' ${USER}/.dmrc

Make sure the user’s ‘.dmrc’ file is updated with the new startlxde-pi session as that is where lightdm login manager looks to decide which desktop should be launched.


Tagged: linux

September 16, 2017

Let me start by annoying you with some pictures:

<3 Randa

The misty mountains below which the coders dwell.

We totally had snow in September. Well, not in Randa, but in the valley next to it, but still. SNOW!

And now for the serious part: in my last blog post, I talked about achieving our main goal for this year’s Randa meetings – we successfully ported the entire Kontact away from the obsoleted KDateTime class. Since we finished this on Thursday, there was still enough time left to start working on something new and exciting.

Volker and Frederik went on to work on a KWin plugin to simulate various kinds of color blindness which will help developers to see how visually impaired users see their software, I did a bit more code clean-up after the porting and a bit of code-review.

On Friday morning Volker and I discussed search in KDE PIM. Broken and unreliable search was one of the most often mentioned issues in the KMail User Survey, which we ran for the past month and a half, so I decided to tackle the problem and make our indexing and searching infrastructure fast and reliable.

The final plan consists of several phases – starting with reorganizing our current code to put related pieces of code (like email indexing and querying code) into a single place to make the code easier to maintain. This phase is already progressing and I hope to finish it within the next week. The second phase will involve moving the code that is responsible for indexing data into the backend Resources – whenever a backend retrieves an email from an IMAP server or an event from Google Calendar it will also index it and will send the index data alongside the raw data to Akonadi. Akonadi will then take care for just writing the data into the Xapian database. This will speed up indexing, reduce the IO load and will ensure that all data are reliably indexed and stored before they are presented in Kontact. The third phase will involve changing Kontact to query the index database directly, instead of asking Akonadi to do it for us. This will speed up the search and provide results faster. The final phase will focus on which data we are actually indexing. As they say – less is sometimes more – so having fewer, but better-defined data will allow us to provide better and more exact search results to the user.

Once this is settled, we can make applications to depend on the search index – for example KOrganizer will be able to query the index to only get events from e.g. December 2017 instead of fetching all events from the calendar and then figuring out if they should be displayed or not, making calendars of even the busiest people to load instantaneously.

All in all, it was an extremely productive hackfest for the PIM team and I’d again like to thank Mario, Christian and the rest of the Randa team for organizing the hackfest. You guys rock!

And remember, you can still donate to the Randa fundraiser to make future productive sprints possible!

This past week artist David Revoy visited the Université Cergy-Pontoise in Paris France to give a Krita training. The university’s teacher, Nicolas Priniotakis, has been using linux and other open source technology such as Blender. This was the first time the students have been exposed to Krita…and the results were a success with the help of David!

You can read more about David’s trip and see what was taught during the class from his blog: https://www.davidrevoy.com/article335/krita-digital-painting-courses-at-university-cergy-pontoise

 

September 15, 2017

Last time we heard the publictransport applet was being re-written was almost a year back now. Since then, it has indeed gone through some sorts of rewrite, but at the Randa meetings, 2017, this has taken a whole new course. Since the time I began porting the publictransport dataengine, to be used with a new … Continue reading Plasma publictransport rewrite – Part II

At the Randa Meeting 2017 Volker and I decided to write a little KWin plugin. Activating this plugin you can simulate various types of color vision deficiencies, either on individual windows or full-screen. The plugin works by running a fragment shader on the respective window/screen.

Here is a short video demonstrating what we did:

The purpose is to allow everyone to test applications problematic color schemes.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness

The post Testing Applications for Color Blindness appeared first on Qt Blog.

September 14, 2017

On the morning of Day 5 we chased and fixed a problem that was introduced a long time ago but never caused any trouble. The code goes back into the KDE3 version of KMyMoney and was caused by some changes inside Qt5. The fix prevents a crash when saving a transaction which opens an additional …

Marco Martin recently posted about some of the improvements in krunner, today I want to show some of the effort into navigating the Plasma panels.

This video shows a user navigating the plasma panel using voice and keyboard. A shortcut focusses the panel, and then one can use tab and cursor keys as normal. In future we will improve our key-focus visual indicators, and allow for richer interaction.

What makes Plasma different to existing apps

Plasma in general has been a sore point with regards to accessibility as it doesn’t follow some of the exact same concepts as a traditional toolkit. Some of these convention breakages are by design, in krunner you wouldn’t want to have to tab to a list of results in order to navigate results with the cursor keys. Unfortunately these changes, if done non-optimally, really conflict with core concepts of focus and screen reader parsing. On top of that, we have the issues of an emerging toolkit, which needs that extra push to get right.

Why is this work useful?

Blind people aside, the work here has multiple other advantages.

We need better keyboard navigation, regardless. You often hear people say they prefer console apps; it’s not because they’re inherently better, but because being “handicapped” forces them to have good keyboard handling. We should be matching or beating that.

Also, approaching a large code base from a completely different angle has helped to tidy up some complex code that has built up over the years. Kickoff key handling is now not only better but the code is 2/3 the size.



On Day 3, we started out at 7:02 as usual with the team responsible for breakfast meeting in the kitchen. KMyMoney wise, we worked some more on keyboard navigation and porting to KF5. The dialog to open a database and the logic around it have been rewritten/fixed, so that it is now possible to collect …

The main goal for me and Volker for this year Randa Meeting was to port KCalCore, our calendaring library, away from KDateTime. KDateTime/KTimeZone are classes for handling date, time and time zones which were used back in the KDE4 (and earlier) days when Qt’s QDateTime wasn’t good enough for us, mainly due to missing time zone support.

In Qt5 QDateTime finally gained all the necessary features we need which made it possible for us to leave KDateTime behind. But we couldn’t just go and replace “K” with “Q” everywhere – there are many subtle (and not-so-subtle) differences in API, behavior and some missing features of QDateTime that required us to carefully consider each step. The fact that we started working on this over 2 years ago shows how challenging task this was.

We did not expect to finish the port here, but once we dived into it, things went fairly well and I’m glad to say that after four days of intensive hacking, surrounded by Swiss Alps and mountains of chocolate, we succeeded. KCalCore is now free of KDateTime and KTimeZone and that in turn made (after some minor adjustments) the rest of KDE PIM free of KDELibs4Support. That’s a huge milestone for us.

Many thanks to John Layt for laying the initial ground for the porting and to Mario and Christian for the steady stream of chocolate and sweets to soothe our nerves :-)

If you want to help us to continue improving Kontact and other parts of KDE, please donate to the Randa fundraiser so that we can continue organizing similar productive sprints in the future. Thank you!

KMarkdownWebView 0.1.0 has been released.

The KMarkdownWebView software provides a KParts plugin for rendered display of Markdown files, using web technologies (webpage with JavaScript library which creates HTML from the plaintext handed in). This enables KParts-using applications (like the archiving tool Ark or the file manager Krusader) to show Markdown files in the target format. It is also prepared for the upcoming “Live Preview” plugin for KTextEditor-based applications like the editors/IDEs Kate & KDevelop (see introduction).

The separate library libKMarkdownWebView is done for sharing code with a future Markdown thumbnailer plugin, whose code is not yet committed to the repository.

KMarkdownWebView can be built both with QtWebEngine (preferred by buildsystem) and QtWebKit. Pass -DUSE_QTWEBKIT=TRUE to CMake to enforce the use of QtWebKit.

Download from: https://download.kde.org/stable/kmarkdownwebview/0.1.0/src/

sha256: 361fec6c4fa9396975e788cfe759b1c45a2ccfc2b83e64b5105869ef312a5410 kmarkdownwebview-0.1.0.tar.xz

Notes

The technology behind KMarkdownWebView could be considered rather a hack, to quickly solve the need for rendering Markdown files, with the following requirements in mind:

  • webpage-like layouting (single page adapting width to screen/window size)
  • chrome-less minimalistic UI
  • support of KParts stream API (as useful with “Live Preview” plugin for KTextEditor)

Ideally this would be implemented one day natively in Qt by e.g. using QTextDocument & friends. The Markdown Okular generator gets us already closer to this, but misses all those bullet-points for now.


The news is out! KDE and Purism are working together on a Free software smartphone featuring Plasma Mobile. Purism is running a crowdfunding campaign right now, and if that succeeds, with the help of KDE, the plan is to deliver a smartphone based on Plasma Mobile in January 2019.

Why do I care?

Data collection and evesdropping has become a very common problem. Not only governments (friendly and less-friendly) are spying on us, collecting information about our private lives, also companies are doing so. There is a lot of data about the average user stored in databases around the world that not only allows them to impersonate you, but also to steal from you, to kidnap your data, and to make your life a living hell. There is hardly any effective control how this data is secured, and the more data is out there, the more interesting a target it is to criminals. Do you trust random individuals with your most private information? You probably don’t, and this is why you should care.

Protect your data

Mockup of a Plasma Mobile based phoneMockup of a Plasma Mobile based phone
Mockup of a Plasma Mobile based phone[/caption]The only way to re-gain control before bad things happen is to make sure as little data as possible gets collected. Yet, most electronic products out there do the exact opposite. Worse, the market for smartphones is a duopoly of two companies, neither of which has as a goal the protection of its users. It’s just different flavors of bad.

There’s a hidden price to the cheap services of the Googles and Facebooks of this world, and that is collection of data, which is then sold to third parties. Hardly any user is aware of the problems surrounding that.

KDE has set out to provide users an alternative. Plasma Mobile was created to give users a choice to regain control. We’re building an operating system, transparently, based on the values of Free software and we build it for users to take back control.

Purism and KDE

In the past week, we’ve worked with Purism, a Social Purpose Corporation devoted to bringing security, privacy, software freedom, and digital independence to everyone’s personal computing experience, to create a mobile phone that allows users to regain control.
Purism has started a crowdfunding campaign to collect the funds to make the dream of a security and privacy focused phone.

Invest in your future

By supporting this campaign, you can invest not only into your own future, become an early adopter of the first wave of privacy-protecting personal communication devices, but also to proof that there is a market for products that act in the best interest of the users.

Support the crowdfunding campaign, and help us protect you.


Artist's impression of what Plasma Mobile
would look like on the Librem 5.

"This was the plan all along", said Todd Weaver during a conference call we held with him last week. He was referring to building a free, open, and privacy-respecting smartphone.

[Read the official press release here.]

Purism, Todd's company, produces the Librem computers, laptops with components that, where possible, are guaranteed to be respectful of the user's privacy. Their covers sport two hardware kill-switches, for example. One shuts off the camera. The other closes down WiFi and Bluetooth.

And, although not all components are open hardware,
Purism is perfectly transparent about this, recognizes it's not ideal, and aims to replace them when it becomes possible. Purism's ultimate aim is to achieve what they call Purism Purist state, in which every single chip and board is totally free and open, with all the schematics published under a free licence.

Naturally, the Librem laptops come with GNU/Linux pre-installed.

Now, Purism has set its aims on the smartphone market. Unhappy with the dominance of a few gigantic (and gigantically powerful) multinational corporations that actively crush any competition and leech data from customers wholesale, Todd and his team are raising money to fund a phone that, like the Librem laptops, is as free and open as possible, and respects users' privacy.

This aligns well with KDE's vision of what software should do for the users, and we are actively developing Plasma Mobile, which right now is at a stage where the platform actually works. It seemed logical that we should team up with Purism and work towards the common goal of creating a free and open, commercially viable smartphone.

It is true that Purism has not committed to any given platform yet. What they have done is agreed to help KDE adapt Plasma Mobile to their device, and for that they are committing resources, human and otherwise.

This is a win on both sides. KDE gets to try out Plasma Mobile on a device without having to go through all the guesswork of reverse engineering undocumented hardware. Purism gets to test-run Plasma Mobile on their device and help steer its development so it is fully supported. This gives Plasma Mobile a good chance of becoming the default interface for the Librem 5, although that decision is ultimately one Purism has to take.

However, our first step is to help make the Librem 5 a reality. The success of the crowdfunding effort will be a net gain for the Free Software community regardless of which environment finally gets to run on the hardware.

This is a step we cannot take alone. Support the crowdfunding campaign and you won't only help us succeed, but you can also become part of the project: donate now and you can get your hands on developer kits and early-bird devices!

September 13, 2017

Accessibility in KDE and Qt is constantly improving. Sometimes a change of scenery helps focusing and brings up productivity. Mix that with a bunch of great people and good things will start happening. It has been possible to create accessible Qt applications on Linux for a while, but of course not everything will just work out of the box untested. A while back Mario asked me to join this year’s Randa Meeting where KDE people discuss and fix issues. It turns out that was a great idea. I haven’t been able to focus much on applications and user experience lately, but with this backdrop it works ��View of the mountains and Randa village

Upon arrival I sat down with Marco and David of Plasma fame and we quickly got Orca (the screen reader on Linux) working on their laptops. We discussed what is wrong and where improvements would be most needed for blind users to use the Plasma desktop, we got to work and had the first fixes even before lunch, wow. Adding a few accessibility hints and poking hard at keyboard navigation got us much further.

This means that KRunner – Plasma Desktop’s app launcher – is now much more accessible, a great enabler. There’s more work going into the menu and panel, hopefully we’ll see much improved keyboard usability for these by the end of the week. It’s good to see how Qt accessibility works nicely with Qt Quick.

In the afternoon, we had a round of introductions and talks. For accessibility some key points were:
– Don’t do custom stuff if you can avoid it. This includes colors and fonts, but also focus handling.
– Try running your application with keyboard only. And then mouse only.
– Make sure that focus handling actually works, then test with a screen reader.
– Oh, and focus handling. Check the order of your tab focus chain (in Qt Designer or by running your Qt Quick application. While I’ve lately become a big fan of the Qt Quick Designer, I don’t think it allows to detect all corner cases when it comes to tab key handling yet.)
– I should write and talk more about FocusScope, one our our best and most confusing one bit friends in Qt Quick.

Introductions in Randa

I sat down to poke at the systemsettings module, making it easier to debug and a bit more reliable. This morning I sat down with Ade to poke at why Calamares (the installer framework with the highest squid content ever) is not accessible. When running it as a regular user, the results were actually all in all quite OK. But it usually (for historical reasons) gets launched as root. While that may be fixed eventually, it was worth investigating what the issue really is, because, well, it should work. After a bit of poking, comparing DBus messages and then a break (Yoga and Acrobatics), we spotted that an old bug hadn’t actually been really fixed, just almost. Applications run as root would connect to the right DBus bus (AT-SPI2 runs its own bus), but we just failed to actually initialize things properly. Turns out that in this slightly different code path, we’d emit a signal in a constructor, before it was connected to the receiver… oops. The fix is making its way into Qt as we speak, so everything is looking and sounding good ��

[Note: the blog post was written yesterday, but I never got around to publishing it, so everything is off by a day, just shift it back by one day. Then you can imagine how I will sit down the next evening for a bit of late night blogging and pancakes (that’s about now).]

The post Accessibility improvements in Randa appeared first on Qt Blog.

I have decided to try to publish a short or not too short blog post each week some development happen in Elisa Git repository. I am inspired amongst others by the current posts about development of Kube.

I have updated the wiki page bout Elisa to include howto build instructions Elisa. Please have a look and improve them if you can.

The following items have been pushed:

  • A fix for memory leak when modifying the paths to be indexed by the Elisa files indexer ;
  • Do not display the disc number in play list when the track is from an album with a single disc.

I am still working on the notifications and a small progress has been made for the integration of visualizations when playing music.


Few weeks ago I attended QtCon Brasil, an event organised by Brazilian members in the KDE Community who wanted to have an outreach event to the local technology community about Qt and beyond. It was great.

Welcome

It’s always refreshing to get out of your own circles to meet new people and hear what they are up to. For me, it was more notable than ever! Different culture, different people, different backgrounds, different hemisphere!

We had a variety of presentations. From the mandatory KDE Frameworks talk by Filipe:
Filipe talking about KDE Frameworks 5

Some PyQt experience by Eliakin
Eliakin discussing PyQt

And a lot more, although I didn’t understand everything, given my limited knowledge of the language consists of mapping it to Spanish or Catalan.

We got to hear about many projects in the region doing really cool stuff with Qt. From drug research and development to Point of Sale devices.
Us in the Free Software world, we are not always exposed to a good deal of development happening right before us, with the same technologies. It is fundamental to keep having such events where we learn how people create software, even if it’s on close environments.

Myself, I got to present Kirigami. It’s a very important project for KDE and I was happy to introduce it to the audience. My impression is that the presentation was well received, I believe that such wider community sees the value in convergence and portability like we do. Starting to deliver applications useful in a variety of scenarios will bring new light to how we use our computing systems.

Here you can find my slides and the examples I used.

Kirigami at QtCon


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